Every year, the fashion elite descend on the French Riviera for the Festival de Cannes, a celebration of cinema served with yacht-hopping parties. And with miles of red carpets to tread, the Cannes film festival plays host to some seriously stylish men.

With everyone and their agent getting tuxed up to the nines, these are the lessons to learn from the men who proved you can abide by the dress code and still flex some sartorial muscle.

Chris Pine – Hell Or High Water Premiere

Chris Pine’s grey, double-breasted suit proved the first rule of tailoring: know thy shape. Because although your tailor can fit a suit to your dimensions, you still need to pick a style that flatter what’s under it.

If you’ve got paving stones pecs of most leading men, a double-breasted jacket makes you look top heavy. But for tall and slim guys like Pine, the extra material and punchy lapels accentuate your shoulders, to add weight and width to your upper body.

Chris Pine

Edgar Ramirez – Weinstein Company Party

You don’t always have to think outside the box when when the invite calls for a tuxedo. If, like Ramirez, you nail the fit, then a classic double-breasted tuxedo and bow tie always looks on-point.

Especially when your slim-fit trousers break just right on equally sleek patent shoes, to lengthen your legs and make you look taller, leaner, and just damn handsome.

Edgar Ramirez

Laurent Lafitte – Photocell

The Cannes host’s opening jokes may have shown a lack of taste, but his wardrobe was rather more a refined. If you’re looking to keep your formal ensemble casual, Lafitte’s pairing of a sharply-cut grey two-piece suit with white sneakers is worth copying.

Lose the tie and accessorise with some wayfarers for a Mediterranean air, regardless of your locale.

Laurent Lafitte

Mark Ronson – Chopard Party

Even if you’re DJing a jewellery brand’s Cannes party, there’s nothing wrong with peacocking. Mr Ronson deftly rides this season’s 1970s trend with a wide-lapelled velvet tux, in a blue that reflects flashbulbs just right.

Worn with a bow tie, this look would quickly veer into weird uncle territory. So opt for an open collar and printed shirt to keep the right side of fancy dress.

Mark Ronson

Ryan Gosling – The Nice Guys Photo-Call

It’s no revelation that Ryan Gosling knows his way around a red carpet, but his Cannes looks are a masterclass in dressing up in warmer weather.

By all means keep it classic when it comes to the suit, but feel free to pop a few shirt buttons for a more casual take on suited and booted. Then stand next to a guy who borrowed Jeremy Clarkson’s wardrobe, to make your getup look even sharper.

Ryan Gosling

Adam Driver – Paterson Premiere

For a black tie event, the dress code can mean exactly that. A form-fitting fit suit will always see you right, but like Driver, you can avoid looking like you’re off to a funeral by offsetting formal attire with a casual shoe.

The suede wallabee has made a resurgence over the past few seasons, so don’t be afraid to switch out a lace-up Oxford or Derby for something a little more relaxed.

Adam Driver

Jack O’Connell – Money Monster Photo-Call

Silver screen bad boy and Prada muse Jack proves his place once again, with a lesson in how to attract lenses at a premiere.

Swerving the business-as-usual black suit, O’Connell teams his striking tonal blue tailoring with an even inkier shirt. It’s a brave and confident choice, but goes to show that experimenting with hues can seriously pay off.

Jack O’Connell

Oliver Cheshire – Chopard

For most men, wearing a tuxedo without a bow tie or socks, and picking brown shoes over high-shine black, would demonstrate an unfamiliarity with the rulebook. When you’re Oliver Cheshire, and your jacket and trousers are cut just snug enough, it shows you’re so familiar with the rules you know just how far to bend them.

The closer you are to Cheshire’s bone structure, the easier this is to pull off.

Oliver Cheshire

Clive Owen – Nice Airport

The red carpet isn’t Cannes’ only sartorial playground. While jetting in, Clive Owen delivered a lecture in long-haul luxe. Dress down a classic navy suit by layering a lightweight knit underneath, and accessorise with a silk neck scarf; it adds some interest and helps counteract the on-flight air con.

A pair of muted sneakers is the perfect finishing touch, while tortoiseshell wayfarers hide red-eye from camera bulbs as bright as the Cannes sunshine.

Clive Owen