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  1. #1

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    We want your opinion: Crowd funding fashion

    Hi guys,
    We had taken your feedback before we launched our campaign and tried to incorporate what you all had said.
    Our campaign is now live and would love to hear your thoughts about our product.

    We were also reviewed by Justin Jeffers from The Fine Young Gentleman and he gave us an incredibly positive review.

    We are extremely confident about the quality of our product and we know that none of our competitors can offer the same.
    Would love to know what you guys think: http://igg.me/at/finest-shirts

    Kind regards,
    Yashas Alur
    Co-Founder
    Buttons 'n' Threads

  2. #2

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    In all honesty the advert still looks identical other than different vocal tone in the commentary. I think you've completely missed the opportunity to show both the garment in production (other than a shot of the stitching, I'm talking shots of the factory / team) and also the measurement process. At the moment all I'm seeing is a company saying they have the best shirts in the world, all other shirt makers are inferior, and shots of some bloke pouting whilst wearing it. There is nothing in the advert that has convinced me, sorry.

    Just by way of example, one of the nicest videos for a quality company I saw was for Cheaney shoes. Very humble, heritage and a thorough demo and explanation of the product. I really felt I was buying I to quality, and they didn't rely on slating the competition either - here it is: Cheaney Shoes - advice on styles, lasts and fitting - YouTube

  3. #3
    James's Avatar

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    The quality seems good and it seems like a good shirt. But, it was a bit internet scam marketing for my liking. Big warning on the first page, lots of big brand logos flying around, talking about superior quality.

    If it were me, I would start from the beginning with your marketing strategy. Marketing has changed from what it was 5 years ago and it will change again. It seemed outdated and out of touch.

    Creed is right. We want that more down to earth feel, that more natural approach when it comes to seeing your quality. Big brands are struggling with their marketing these days. Viral videos and the social media have changed the way the masses absorb marketing campaigns.
    Its not about 1m Actors showing off your 1000 shirt. These days a campaign made from nothing has just as much chance to make it viral.

    So I would stop with the worrying about the competition, and just do you.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Creed View Post
    In all honesty the advert still looks identical other than different vocal tone in the commentary. I think you've completely missed the opportunity to show both the garment in production (other than a shot of the stitching, I'm talking shots of the factory / team) and also the measurement process. At the moment all I'm seeing is a company saying they have the best shirts in the world, all other shirt makers are inferior, and shots of some bloke pouting whilst wearing it. There is nothing in the advert that has convinced me, sorry.

    Just by way of example, one of the nicest videos for a quality company I saw was for Cheaney shoes. Very humble, heritage and a thorough demo and explanation of the product. I really felt I was buying I to quality, and they didn't rely on slating the competition either - here it is: Cheaney Shoes - advice on styles, lasts and fitting - YouTube
    What a great video! Couldn't stop watching til the very end! You can really tell that he knows what he's talking about and he loves it.

  5. #5

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    The Cheaney shoes video is indeed very well made.
    I understand your response on our marketing message. It is a challenge to compete on quality if we aren't comparing it to anything else, especially keeping in mind that not too many people would know about the quality details that we are talking about.
    However, it does seem that we've dropped the ball on the marketing message and it could have been more down to earth.

    Although the video could have been improved on, I would love to know what you guys think about the product itself. Here is a link to our review on The Fine Young Gentleman. We are certainly very proud of the shirts that we make and we're confident that they are one of the finest in the industry (of course not comparing ourselves to traditional bespoke shirt makers).

    Thank you for your responses, would love to hear more of your thoughts.

    Kind regards,
    Yashas

  6. #6
    Nat

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    Feels like an indoctrination video for a cult tbh. Plus I don't really get the crowdfunding thing. The appeal for help was a bit odd. Also I don't think you should be comparing yourself to designer labels. It's the Jermyn St shirtmakers who are your benchmark really.

    The shirts themselves look fine. Though if you're going to claim that they're tailored to the individual, then make sure that you, your partner, and the model are looking sharp.

  7. #7

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    Firstly, just to echo some of the above comments, the shirts DO look like quality, they look good. However, I think you've really underestimated your market though.
    Shirt buyers are broadly going to be either a) someone who just wants a shirt and will never care about fit or quality, b) someone who wants a designer label on their shirt, c) someone who wants a shirt to fit perfectly, or d) someone who wants the best shirt in the world. Of course they might want a combination of these, but with all the will in the world, all you can provide at the moment and therefore your target market is 'c'. You might be able to convert some of type 'a' and 'b', but by your own admission you cannot compete with the best shirt in the world from the likes of the long established shirt makers.

    Those most likely to be your customers and who would search online for bespoke shirts (c), would probably find it quite patronising to be told in your advert that they have been getting it wrong all along by buying designer shirts, because it implies they are mugs, naive and easily ripped off, and that's if they even buy them at all. More often than not people buy a gucci shirt for the label and not for the cloth quality! And to make a statement like yours above that most people don't understand quality detail is true for the general shirt buyer - but not for your target audience, which are those who are aware of at least the basics of tailoring and bespoke. Someone like me who buys bespoke understands and is passionate about lots of detail and will probably already know before he even looks at your website exact what he wants in a bespoke shirt.

    So I guess you need to have a think about the marketing, who are you really aiming at, if it's designer label fans as per your promotion, you have an uphill struggle to get them to want to boast that they have traded their prada shirt for a buttons and threads one.

    And from first hand experience, if it's the true bespoke fan you are chasing such as me, if you don't have quality that quite matches the top shirt makers in the world, but is better than a high street shirt, you can really only win shirt orders on 3 factors - fabric range, speed of manufacture and above all price. I currently would expect a shirt to be bespoke in under 4 weeks for under 80, preferably 60 for an impulse buy, and would expect at least 40 different whites to chose from. I used rajawongse shirts, they sent me 45 white fabrics and did 5 for 35 each delivered. Minimum order was 5. It was their price and fabric range that made me place the order, not a load of marketing about being the worlds best. The ONLY people who can say they are the worlds be are the customers, when a company says it, no one believes it. Just walk into Sam's Tailors in Hong Kong - not the best fabrics in the world and certainly not the best tailor, but massive choice, cheap and a whole shop plastered with celebrity photo endorsements. If you walk into my tailors, asuitthatfits in London City, you'll find a photo of me on their wall they certainly know how to endorse!

    I think your marketing would be more powerful focusing on price, production time scales and choice of features in the shirt.

    Hope this helps!!

  8. #8
    Nat

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    ^ What he said

  9. #9
    James's Avatar

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    well said Creed. What is your day job again.lol

  10. #10
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    It's an impressive project and I particularly like the ethical aspect to the company. I think that's something you could really pull people in on, and your clothes are at a price point similar (if not lower) than a lot of eco or ethical clothes.

    However what Creed said is right. The best bit of your campaign is where you compare the different stats and show your shirts are broadly similar to Charvet's, as that has no element of ego or reputation comparing about it and is about the 'brass tacks' of it. The guy's review also did you a good service as well as it was pretty in-depth.

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