FashionBeans: Men's Fashion & Men's Style Guide
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulAnderson View Post
    I think this is an interesting point too. I tend to justify spending more on things because I know how careful I am with them. I'm fussy to the point of getting changed when I get in so I'm not slouching around in nice stuff, and being very particular not to get things dirty or stretched.
    Haha, I'm exactly the same. I've been known to get changed several times in a day to preserve the longevity of my clothes if I'm in and out of the house. I'm quite happy to get dressed to go to the supermarket, come home and put on slouching clothes, get dressed to be out somewhere else (often in different clothes), etc. etc.

    I do it for the same reasons. I don't want good quality clothing get dirty or sweaty if I'm only wearing around the house. So much of what I own is dry cleaning only (and dry cleaning too often is a killer both on the fabric and the wallet), so it makes absolute financial sense to only wear those high quality items when I'm actually likely to be seen by anyone.

  2. #22
    William Colman's Avatar

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    I actually spend 90% of my time in horrible grey joggers, old t shirts and a hoodie I have accumulated from somewhere, I'd feel uncomfortable just lounging around in my nice clothes; they come off as soon as I come in, its the first thing I do, then I can be a slobbish as I like and not worry.

  3. #23
    rubyblue's Avatar

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    I actually change several times before going to the supermarket across the street. And believe me, there aren't many stylish people shopping there, probably nobody gives a fuck.

  4. #24
    Ash

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    I went to a pet store yesterday, felt slightly over-dressed with the stares. I think they thought I'd just fallen off the catwalk. But, I don't buy nice clothes to wear around the house. What's wrong with dressing up whether you're going out anywhere or not? Clothes make you feel good! :]

    I generally put on in the morning what I plan to stay in. Like, I don't pay £450 for a cashmere jumper to sit in the wardrobe to be worn only when going out... What's the point?

  5. #25
    Jay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ash View Post

    I generally put on in the morning what I plan to stay in. Like, I don't pay £450 for a cashmere jumper to sit in the wardrobe to be worn only when going out... What's the point?
    And what's the point in sitting in a £450 cashmere jumper around the house if nobody will see you in it? Wearing your best/most expensive clothes around the house is kind of like getting an expensive haircut only to wear a hat all of the time. Kinda pointless.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay View Post
    And what's the point in sitting in a £450 cashmere jumper around the house if nobody will see you in it? Wearing your best/most expensive clothes around the house is kind of like getting an expensive haircut only to wear a hat all of the time. Kinda pointless.
    I'm not sure I agree with that entirely. I don't dress for people to see, I dress for how I feel and often how the clothes feel, so I wouldn't have a problem getting dressed up if I was staying in. I just don't like putting unnecessary wear on my clothes by sitting around stretching them. I’ll often get changed if I’m going to be playing with my children and crawling around the floor.

    I agree there is no point having nice clothes if they are going to spend most of their life in the wardrobe.

    My wife is very much like this. She saves clothes for “best”, and ends up never wearing them. I bought her some shoes for an anniversary that she loves so much she’s only worn them twice. That sentence on its own just sounds wrong doesn’t it.

  7. #27
    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay View Post
    And what's the point in sitting in a £450 cashmere jumper around the house if nobody will see you in it?
    Because it shouldn't be bought solely to impress other people. Not that I would, but if I bought something like a £450 jumper i'd wear it because it's warm and comfortable, I highly doubt anyone I meet would care whether it was merino or cashmere, and I wouldn't care if they noticed (unless I was just trying to justify the price tag to myself of course).

    I understand the consideration of longevity, but if something costs £450 and isn't going to last with reasonable/regular use, I simply wouldn't buy it.

  8. #28

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    well I struck a deal with a local tailor who I have been told is good for a suit, shirt and overcoat for 600 euros!

  9. #29
    Jay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom View Post
    Because it shouldn't be bought solely to impress other people. Not that I would, but if I bought something like a £450 jumper i'd wear it because it's warm and comfortable, I highly doubt anyone I meet would care whether it was merino or cashmere, and I wouldn't care if they noticed (unless I was just trying to justify the price tag to myself of course).

    I understand the consideration of longevity, but if something costs £450 and isn't going to last with reasonable/regular use, I simply wouldn't buy it.
    £450 jumpers aren't made of magic. They wear out as quickly as those costing £100 from my experience.

    The more you wear something the sooner it will wear out, so why let that wearing out happen at home when you could be in your scruffs (not that my scruffs are really scruffs).

    If you think you don't dress for others, psychology would like a word with you. Clothing is about a) environment (I need to be warm and comfy) and b) society (I want to stand out/blend in/to impress/appear attractive/rebel etc etc.) If it was all about a) you could find warmth and comfort in something far less expensive than a £450 jumper. You can deny b) all you like you but you do b) anyway.

  10. #30
    Jay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulAnderson View Post

    I agree there is no point having nice clothes if they are going to spend most of their life in the wardrobe.

    My wife is very much like this. She saves clothes for “best”, and ends up never wearing them. I bought her some shoes for an anniversary that she loves so much she’s only worn them twice. That sentence on its own just sounds wrong doesn’t it.
    It's not about best for me. I'll put as much effort and consideration into what I will wear for a trip to the supermarket as a night out on the town, so I don't really have 'best' or 'going out' clothes and those I like most get the most wear. They certainly don't sit in the wardrobe.

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