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  1. #591

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    I have the foreman in blue: it's awesome. I just need some light beige/white trousers and loafers to wear with it.

    Collar up or down, though?

  2. #592
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    Quote Originally Posted by _Ben_ View Post
    I have the foreman in blue: it's awesome. I just need some light beige/white trousers and loafers to wear with it.

    Collar up or down, though?
    The upturned collar (especially on a blazer) is cliche and try-hard, and you end up looking like a 12 year old kid doing it 'to be a rebel' at school. There is no excuse.
    Last edited by Jay; 13-04-2012 at 11:25 AM.

  3. #593

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    But...but...what if you put it on and it goes like that?

    Incidentally, I saw a chap wearing a double-breasted the other day, undone, and it looks horrendous. The shape was awful, as the lapels just flopped, and it looked like he'd been on a massive diet and was now wearing the clothes he wore when he was his larger self. It's odd because the foreman jacket I own is unlike any double-breasted I've worn/seen. Perhaps it's because it's cotton and holds its shape well when worn undone/done-up?

  4. #594

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    The Foreman seems to be very slim for a DB, the overlapping breasts aren't anywhere near as wide as most double-breasted blazers. I think that's why it looks OK open, the profile isn't drastically different from a single-breasted blazer. I picked up a proper double breasted blazer in a charity shop a few weeks back and it looks awful undone (I actually dislike it full stop, but it only cost me a quid). The overlapping bit is much, much wider, causing the jacket to slump when open.

  5. #595
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    Quote Originally Posted by McPhee View Post
    The Foreman seems to be very slim for a DB, the overlapping breasts aren't anywhere near as wide as most double-breasted blazers. I think that's why it looks OK open, the profile isn't drastically different from a single-breasted blazer. I picked up a proper double breasted blazer in a charity shop a few weeks back and it looks awful undone (I actually dislike it full stop, but it only cost me a quid). The overlapping bit is much, much wider, causing the jacket to slump when open.
    It's a style faux-pas to wear a double breasted jacket/blazer unbuttoned whilst standing, your AS one included.

  6. #596

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    Meh. If it looks fine to me then I'm not too bothered. If I lived somewhere where people take style more seriously then maybe I'd consider the 'rules', but around here it's not so important. The competition is basically just tweens in hoodies, chinos and high-tops, 30-somethings in head-to-toe Superdry/Henleys and overweight, aging men in washed jeans and suit jackets. As mistakes go, wearing this particular jacket open isn't likely to register on the local radar.

  7. #597

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    Do fashion faux-pas exist? A few years ago I'd have considered showing socks or wearing ankle-grazers crazy: it looks like you can't afford a pair of jeans which don't fit properly. Fashion is an organic movement of change, revision, and interpretation. At the end of the day, if it fits and you think it looks good, then that's fine. If you're confident about an outfit it will usually always work; if you're famous you become an icon, usually regardless of whether the items are expensive or carry brand-names. James Dean wore an old A-2 jacket: you could probably pick these up for pennies in those days. Ralph Lauren did their own version of this jacket: 900. What a rip off. Eastman Leather Clothing and Goodwear make stitch-for-stitch reproductions of these jackets for less. Unfortunately in fashion, much like the art world, once a person or a company has proven themselves they can be as radical in pricing and design as they like, and their items will still become instant hits and set trends. We all follow like sheep.

    For instance, I'd consider this a faux-pas:



    But clearly someone doesn't...
    Last edited by _Ben_; 13-04-2012 at 07:13 PM.

  8. #598

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    Lightbulb

    Haha, he looks like an extra from a b-movie sci-fi film. Seeing as thinner jumpers, smart shirts, and shoes are the things lacking in my wardrobe, I've just purchased these two items from Reiss:


    Substance Shawl-neck jumper




    Havelock tassel loafers


  9. #599

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    Nice items, I love Reiss's clothing. Their lookbook is second to none.
    I want this but it's sold out in a small I should have bought it faster...


  10. #600
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    Quote Originally Posted by _Ben_ View Post
    Do fashion faux-pas exist? A few years ago I'd have considered showing socks or wearing ankle-grazers crazy: it looks like you can't afford a pair of jeans which don't fit properly. Fashion is an organic movement of change, revision, and interpretation. At the end of the day, if it fits and you think it looks good, then that's fine. If you're confident about an outfit it will usually always work; if you're famous you become an icon, usually regardless of whether the items are expensive or carry brand-names. James Dean wore an old A-2 jacket: you could probably pick these up for pennies in those days. Ralph Lauren did their own version of this jacket: 900. What a rip off. Eastman Leather Clothing and Goodwear make stitch-for-stitch reproductions of these jackets for less. Unfortunately in fashion, much like the art world, once a person or a company has proven themselves they can be as radical in pricing and design as they like, and their items will still become instant hits and set trends. We all follow like sheep.

    For instance, I'd consider this a faux-pas:



    But clearly someone doesn't...
    There are basic style guidelines that have been guidelines for a very long time for a very good reason. Anyone with any sartorial nouse whatsoever knows that you don't wear a double-breasted blazer undone, and you ignore those rules at your peril. You're not James Dean; nobody will see you as reinventing style. No matter how groundbreaking you think you are being, they'll simply see a person who doesn't know how to wear a double-breasted blazer.*

    The 'if you're confident, it will work' mantra is a misguided notion that those who have questionable style use to justify terrible fashion choices, which the picture you links exemplifies. He's got to be confident to wear that outfit. Does that confidence mean he looks great? Absolutely not; the outfit is every kind of wrong and he looks terrible.

    *Except most won't notice at all, because people generally don't give a monkey's what others wear.

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